RADIO

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
80 FuSe, 60 CheSS, 40 RoSe, 20 NooSe, 15 TaiL
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FM = phone mode USB  +/-
(83)                        LSB   3 kHz
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Power: db(gain) = 10 log(Pout/Pin)
- 3db = 2x
- 6db = 4x
- 10db = 10x
- 20db = 100x

Voltage: db(voltage) = 20 log (Vout/Vin)
- 6db = 2x
- 12db = 4x
- 30db = 10x
- 40db = 100x
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.aredn.org Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ZyXel home wiring range extender
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.dd-wrt.com - use this download in a link sys WRT150N or WRT54G to put the power.
- also see that fast multimedia guide
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FT-2900 | T1185 | MFJ-874 
Initial Measurements
FWD: 6 watts
REV:  1 watt
SET: cal
SWR: 1.85
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Servo Antenna Controller: roof mount servo - Amazon says it's weak
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Morse Code Resources
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Antenna Calculations:
- 468 / freq (MHz) = length in feet of dipole antenna required
- Multiple ft x 3.28 = length in meters.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
K8SCH repeaters OH-KY-IN ARS: http://ohkyin.org/new16/repeaters.html

VHF:
Northern Cincinnati - Mt Rumpke - 146.925Mhz (-600khz) (PL123)
Downtown Cincinnati - Clifton       - 146.670Mhz (-600Khz) (PL123)
Northern Kentucky                        - 146.625hz (-600Khz) (PL123)

UHF
Downtown Cincinnati - in Clifton   - 443.7625 (+5mhz) (NO PL TONE)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ISS call signs: NA1SS and RUØSS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- http://arrlexamreview.appspot.com/
- marc@carestandard.com 
- Jx2-dke-wR5-GLA
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
APRS site: http://aprs.fi/#!addr=41017 - see mobile and stationary Hams
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ham database: https://www.qrz.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How to locate towers: How to locate cell towers.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tram-Browning Antennas: http://www.trambrowning.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Northern KY Amateur Radio: http://k4co.org/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FCC License Request and Management Site: ref
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Scanner Information http://www.dxing.com/selscan.htm
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ICOM IC-A23
- TX 118.000-136.975
- RX 108.000-136.975
- WX 161.650-163.275
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yaesu USA 
6125 Phyllis Drive
Cypress, CA 90630 USA
1-714-827-7600

- FT-2900R
- TX 144-146 MHz or 144-148 MHz
- RX 144-148 MHz or 136-174 MHz
- WX - 1050 HZ - severe weather tone - can cause an alarm to be emitted from the FT-2900R
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: a signal to change channels during commercials (dev only) can use 219-220 MHz.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bandwidth Requirements: ARRL Technician Book (see "Comparing Types of Modulation")
CW
SSB Voice
AM Voice
FM Voice
Commercial Video

 Type Freq Type     Freq
CW 150 Hz  
SSB Voice 2-3 kHzSSB
Digital
0.5-3.0 kHz
AM
Voice
 6 kHzAM
Broadcast
10 kHz
FM
Voice
10-15 kHz
T8A09
FM
Broadcast
150 kHz
Video

 6 MHz  

Bandwidth Requirements:  ARRL Technician Book (see "Comparing Types of Modulation")
CW
SSB Voice
AM Voice
FM Voice
Commercial Video

 Type Freq Type     Freq
CW 150 Hz  
SSB Voice 2-3 kHzSSB
Digital
0.5-3.0 kHz
AM
Voice
 6 kHzAM
Broadcast
10 kHz
FM 
Voice
10-15 kHzFM
Broadcast
150 kHz
Video

 6 MHz  
         
        HF  VHF                                                            VHF UHF
<<-------| ----->            VEHF                                   <-----  | ----->                 
 30 MHz | 50 MHz | 144 MHz | 219-220 MHz | 300 MHz | 902-928 MHz | 1240-1300 MHz
   10M         6M           2M            1.25M                                    33cm              23cm

- 'E' in VEHF is for "sporadic E layer"

      
         HF  VHF          VEHF                                       VHF  UHF                                     UHF          
<<--------|--------------------------------------------------------------|---------------------------------------->>
 30 MHz | 50 MHz | 144 MHz | 219-220 MHz | 300 MHz | 902-928 MHz | 1240-1300 
   10M    |    6M           2M            1.25M              1M                 33cm            23cm      

- 'E' in VEHF is for "sporadic E layer"

- Radio Spectrum in real (my) terms:
-   88-108 MHz     - FM  
- 108-136 MHz     - Aviation Radiolocation
- 550 - 1700 kHz  - AM
> 20 KHz              - Radio frequency
< 20 KHz              - Audible

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--- Subscribed to the following sources for disaster information.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--- Shortwave Radios on the International Space Station
There are currently three stations flying aboard the ISS in three different modules. Along with the original Ericsson 2-meter handheld transceiver and packet modem in the Zarya module, there are Kenwood dual-band (VHF and UHF) radios in the Zvezda service module near the dining table, and another station in the Columbus module.

The Ericsson MP-A VHF rig in Columbus has a reputation for ruggedness and reliability, but after 16 years of operation aboard the ISS the radio recently started showing error codes and is currently off the air. ARISS operations were transferred to the station in the Russian modules until a replacement station can be sent up. ARISS already had plans to fly a Kenwood D710-GA and power supply, both of which are undergoing final approval and  certification by NASA before going topside.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Many of you have probably seen references to DD-WRT in other reviews and wonder what it is. It is a firmware upgrade to your router that was created by an opensource group called, as you may have guessed, DD-WRT. This upgrade is available only through their website, not through Linksys.

>> Motivation

Now first, why do you need DD-WRT? Because it transforms this router from a piece of junk into a high-performance wireless machine capable of almost seamlessly streaming high-definition video and high-speed Internet games.

We had this router for about 2 months and were terribly frustrated with it. It constantly disconnected us and was just a lot slower than we had expected a Wireless-N router to be. Our Powerbook constantly got dropped from it, causing us to have restart the wireless connection several times a day.

Frustrated, I looked up these Amazon reviews to see if there was something I missed. Then I found a review referencing DD-WRT. After some hesitation, I tried it and it worked. I checked our laptop and it worked fine for the first time since we got the router. However, then I went to Hulu to test the download speed and was blown away. The DD-WRT had turned our once-modest router into a freaking hulk. It now ran as fast wirelessly as it once did only when directly connected by ethernet.

>> How to Install DD-WRT

Now in my story above, I abbreviated the installation process. In reality, learning how to install this firmware took quite a bit more time than I felt it should have. And I am a Computer Science graduate student finished with my PhD coursework. I can't imagine how intimidating the installation procedure must look to the average computer user.

So I wanted to lay out the steps for this specific router so that people can reference it here on Amazon without having to waste their time browsing through documentation.

First, you need to download the firmware file for the WRT150N (this router). It is a little harder to find than your average download:
1. Go to the DD-WRT main site (google "DD-WRT")
2. Click Downloads
3. Click v24
4. Click Broadcom
5. Click Linksys
6. Click WRT150N_v1.1 (you should check the bottom of your router to make sure you have 1.1; you probably do)
7. Click dd-wrt.v24_mini_generic.bin (you want the "mini" and "generic" v24)
8. Save it

Next, you need to reset the router to factory settings. This will erase all your settings so take screen shots of them if you need them. Otherwise, just reset them manually like you did when you first set up the router.
1. Hold down the RED reset button on the back of the router using a pencil or pen for 10 seconds. The power light should start blinking then stop after a while.
2. Unplug the router
3. Plug it back in and wait until it is fully powered on

Next, you need to install the firmware. You can only do it with Chrome or Internet Explorer because for some reason all other browsers are unstable. Also, you should only do it through an ethernet connection because you could ruin your router if you use the unstable wireless connection:
1. Connect to your router directly with an ethernet cable and turn off your wireless connection on your computer.
2. Using Chrome or IE, go to 192.168.1.1. The username is blank and the password is 'admin'.
3. Go to Administration > Firmware Upgrade
4. Browse and open the firmware file you downloaded earlier
5. Wait

You will probably be taken to the DD-WRT screen. You should reset to factory settings again using the method above. But now you should have your brand new smokin' router. The interface for DD-WRT is very similar to the one used by Linksys with almost all the same menu names. An important difference though is that now the USERNAME is 'root' (the password is still 'admin').

Just reset all your old settings and you are done. You can now access and administrate the router wirelessly (it will be called 'dd-wrt' by default instead of 'linksys'). One note: I had to change the router name through the wired connection. But after that, I was able to administrate wirelessly.

If you run into any issues go to the WRT main site, click on Community, then Wiki. However I don't think most people should have issues.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ċ
Marc Curvin,
Sep 10, 2016, 8:36 AM
Comments