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MSCSHOULDER

FADIR test Hip flexion, adduction and internal rotation - Pain to hip  =  femoroacetabular impingement.
FABER test Hip flexion, abduction and external rotation - Pain to groin =  OA
Miller-Fisher Test - Gate improvement p 30 ml CSF tap = ventriculoperitoneal shunt indicated for NPH Thompson Test - passive plantar foot flexion when the calf is squeezed.

Shoulder Examination Redacted From: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSrLbzZzJU8
Neer's sign: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k21FNtBjQ14
Drop arm test: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taVMaab9e8c
Knee Examination: http://www.fammed.wisc.edu/our-department/media/623/knee-exam

Shoulder
1. Inspection
2. Palpation
3. ROM
4. Strength
5. Special Tests

1. Inspection
Gross abnormality
Deformity
Trauma
Swelling of AC joint
Erythema
Warmth
Bilateral Asymmetry
Muscle atrophy esp. of the Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus or Deltoid

2. Palpation
1. Sternoclavicular joint noting any pain
2. Clavicle
3. AC joint (look for the soft spot just posterior to the end of the clavicle)
4. Acromion
5. Subacromial bursa
6. Bicipital groove (anterior superior humoral head)
7. Greater tuberosity which is just anterior to the lateral border of the acromion.
8. Spine of the scapula
9. Supraspinatus
0. Infraspinatus

3. ROM
1. Forward Flexion to 180 degrees (A-Men)
2. Extension to 40 degrees posterior (A-Bird)
3. Abduction from 0 to 180 degrees
4. Abduction of arms down at the sides back to 0 degrees.
5. External rotation with arms at sides and flexed 90 degrees to about 45 deg.
-- Apply scratch test to superior medical aspect of opposite scapula
6. Internal rotation to 65 deg.
-- Reach both hands up the back as far as possible (use inf. border of opp. scapula T7)

4. Strength
1. Flexion
2. Extension
3. External Rotation (Infraspinatus and Teres Minor)
4. Internal Rotation to test subscularis.
5. Jobes test with arms out and thumbs down (dump cans) have pt push up against your hands.
6. Subscularis with Lift Off Test

5. Special Tests for Rotator cuff, Impingement problems, Biceps tendon Labial tears Shoulder Instability
1. Drop Arm test for rotator cuff test (specifically the supraspinatus). Pt will not be able to hold shoulder at 90 degree and it will drop to her side.
2. Impingement tests of the area under the acromioclavicular joint that rotator muscles travers
-- Neer's sign Stabilze scapula, Pronate the affected arm, Passively forward flex the arm as high as possible, this pinches the rotator cuff muscles under the coracoacromial arch.  A positive test is any pain reported by the patient.
-- Hawkins test is performed by forward-flexing the patient's arm to 90 degrees, bending the elbow and then forcibly internally rotating the humerus.  This drives the greater tuberosity  under the coracoacromial arch impinging the supraspinatus tendon.
-- Steves test iw performed by have the patient forward flex her arm against residence with the palm supinated pain indicates biceps tendon or labral pathology.
-- Obrien's test which is a more sensitive test for labral tears. Forward flex the patient's arm to 90 degrees then adduct it 20 degrees and internally rotate it so that the thumb is down. Ask the patient to resist the downward pressure. Next, externally rotate the arm so that the thumb is up and ask to patient to resist downward pressure. A positive test is pain or painful clicking which occurs when the patient's thumb is down and then is somewhat relieved when the patient's thumb is back up.
-- Crank test for labral pathology by abducting the patient arm in scapular plane, flexing the elbow, and applying a gentle axial load to the glenohumoral joint while internally and externally rotating the humerus. A postive test is pain, catching or painful clicking.
-- Apprehension test for glenohumoral joint stability which can be performed with the patient standing or sitting. With one had stabilize the scapula then rotate the arm into 90 degrees abduction then externally rotate the humerus. A positive test is a look of apprehension on the patient's face. The relocation test is applied after a positive apprehension test by applying posterior pressure on the proximal humerus and noting the patient's sense of relief. The anterior relief test for anterior shoulder instability can be performed with the patient in the same position  as for the relo test. A positive test is the report of pain or a feeling of instability on release of pressure from the proximal humerus.

First Version for Smart Phrase redacted from the above.

Shoulder Examination

Inspection:

Palpation: Digital examination of bony landmarks including the acromioclavicular joints, the medial and lateral heads of the clavicles,

Range of motion: Strength: 5/5 in the shoulder and upper extremities bilaterally with symmetrically equal strength on internal and external rotation, abduction and adduction of the upper extremities and shoulders.

Inspection
No gross abnormality
No assymmetry of the upper extremeities or torso. 
No deformity, no rash, no bruising.
No sign of muscular atrophy of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus or deltoid.
No trauma.
No swelling of the AC joint.
No erythema.

Palpation - for tenderness, swelling, irregularity.
None - sternoclavicular joint.
None - clavicle.
None - AC joint.
None - acromion tenderness.
None - subacromial bursa.
None - bicipital groove (anterior superior humoral head)
None - greater tuberosity (just anterior to the lateral border of the acromion).
None - spine of the scapula.
None- supraspinatus.
None - infraspinatus.

ROM - Symmetric bilaterally with no limitations. 
Patient felt initially that he could not raise the left arm above the level of the shoulder on abduction, however subsequent testing did not reveal limitation to motion or remarkable tenderness.
Yes - Forward Flexion to 180 degrees (A-Men)
Yes - Extension to 40 degrees posterior (A-Bird)
Yes - Abduction from 0 to 180 degrees
Yes - Abduction of arms down at the sides back to 0 degrees.
Yes - External rotation with arms at sides and flexed 90 degrees to about 45 deg.
          -- Appled 'scratch test' to superior medical aspect of opposite scapula
Yes - Internal rotation to 65 deg.
         -- Could reach both hands up the back as far as possible (usually inf. border of opposite scapula is at approximately T7)

Strength
5/5 - Flexion
5/5 - Extension
5/5 - External Rotation (Infraspinatus and Teres Minor)
5/5 - Internal Rotation to test subscularis.
5/5 - Jobes test with arms out and thumbs down (dump cans) have pt push up against your hands.
5/5 - Subscularis with Lift Off Test

Special Tests for Rotator cuff for  Impingement, biceps tendon labial tears and shoulder instability
Neg Drop Arm test for rotator cuff test (specifically the supraspinatus). Pt will not be able to hold shoulder at 90 degree and it will drop to the side.
Neg Impingement tests of the area under the acromioclavicular joint that rotator muscles travers
Neg Hawkins test is - forward-flex arm to 90 degrees, bend elbow, forcibly internally rotate the humerus.  Drives the greater tuberosity  under the coracoacromial arch impinging the supraspinatus tendon.
Neg Steves test iw performed by have the patient forward flex her arm against residence with the palm supinated pain indicates biceps tendon or labral pathology.
Obrien's test for labral tears. Forward flex the patient's arm to 90 degrees then adduct it 20 degrees and internally rotate it so that the thumb is down. Ask the patient to resist the downward pressure. Next, externally rotate the arm so that the thumb is up and ask to patient to resist downward pressure. A positive test is pain or painful clicking which occurs when the patient's thumb is down and then is somewhat relieved when the patient's thumb is back up.
Neg Crank test for labral pathology by abducting the patient arm in scapular plane, flexing the elbow, and applying a gentle axial load to the glenohumoral joint while internally and externally rotating the humerus. A postive test is pain, catching or painful clicking.
-- Apprehension test for glenohumoral joint stability which can be performed with the patient standing or sitting. With one had stabilize the scapula then rotate the arm into 90 degrees abduction then externally rotate the humerus. A positive test is a look of apprehension on the patient's face. The relocation test is applied after a positive apprehension test by applying posterior pressure on the proximal humerus and noting the patient's sense of relief. The anterior relief test for anterior shoulder instability can be performed with the patient in the same position  as for the relo test. A positive test is the report of pain or a feeling of instability on release of pressure from the proximal humerus.
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